WELCOME!

We are a Catholic parish where people experience Jesus Christ in a way that changes how we live.

This is a place of God’s mercy and hope, where all feel welcomed, loved, forgiven, and encouraged to live out the Good News. Our doors are wide open so that all may enter. These same doors are also wide open so we can go out and share that good news with others.

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Upcoming Events

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Informational Meeting

August 16th @ 6:30 pm

Portage Public Library

RSVP to lfearing@fearings.com 

 

St. Mary School 22nd Annual Golf Outing

Sunday, Aug 26th Registration at 11am and Shotgun start at 12:30
For more information, sign-up and sponsorship details please click on the picture below.

 

ALPHA

All adults are invited! Click on the Alpha picture above for more information about Alpha.

Evening sign up:

September 11th 6:00 to 8:00 pm

Sign up for Evening Class

 

Daytime sign up:

September 13th 9:00 to 11:00 am

Sign up for Daytime Class

 

Saturday, September 15, 2018

 10:00 am to 2:00 pm

Columbia County Fairgrounds

Volunteers are recruited from the community to provide services for the guests. On the day of the clinic, we will hold a volunteer training at 9:00, prior to the opening of doors.

We need volunteers from 9:00 am – 3: 00 pm, in two, 3 hour shifts. 9-12, and 12-3 

Click here for more information on volunteering.

Next meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, August 15th at 5:15pm at

Blau Family Chiropractic – 641 Latton Lane, Portage WI.

Video of the Week

Article of the Week

 
 

Pope Francis warns of two paths to holiness

May 10, 2018
This article appears in the Gaudete et Exsultate feature series. View the full series.
 

Pope Francis arrives to lead his general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican May 2. (CNS/Reuters/Stefano Rellandini)

As a spiritual guide to those seeking to be better Christians, Pope Francis recognizes that many are tempted to follow the wrong paths to holiness. These are not bad people following the path of sin, but good people getting lost in the woods without a map. Francis believes that it is especially important to warn Christians of two false paths to holiness.

In Chapter 2 of Gaudete et Exsultate, an apostolic exhortation released in March, Francis explains that these are not new temptations. Christians through the centuries have been so tempted, and spiritual writers have labeled these false paths Gnosticism and Pelagianism. These are old temptations repackaged for a new age.

In Gnosticism, perfection is measured by information and knowledge or by some special experience, not by one's charity. The Gnostic takes pride in understanding everything, in having special knowledge.

"Gnostics think that their explanations can make the entirety of the faith and the Gospel perfectly comprehensible," explains Francis. "They absolutize their own theories and force others to submit to their way of thinking." They "reduce Jesus' teaching to a cold and harsh logic that seeks to dominate everything."

Francis considers Gnosticism one of the most sinister ideologies because, "while unduly exalting knowledge or a specific experience, it considers its own vision of reality to be perfect." Gnostics "domesticate mystery" and think they know everything.

"When somebody has an answer for every question, it is a sign that they are not on the right road," according to Francis. "God infinitely transcends us; he is full of surprises," explains Francis. "Someone who wants everything to be clear and sure presumes to control God's transcendence."

The Gnostics' conviction that they alone have the truth leads them to claim that their way of understanding the truth authorizes them to exercise a strict supervision over others' lives.

Francis, on the other hand, believes that "in the church there legitimately coexist different ways of interpreting many aspects of doctrine and Christian life." Our understanding and expression of doctrine "is not a closed system, devoid of the dynamic capacity to pose questions, doubts, inquiries."

He cites Pope John Paul II, who warned of the temptation on the part of those in the church who are more highly educated "to feel somehow superior to other members of the faithful." Gnostics can think that because they know something, or are able to explain it in certain terms, that they are already saints, perfect and better than the "ignorant masses."

While Gnostics take pride in their knowledge, Pelagians take pride in their personal efforts. Gnostics stress the intellect, while Pelagians stress the will.

Pelagians "ultimately trust only in their own powers and feel superior to others because they observe certain rules or remain intransigently faithful to a particular Catholic style," reports Francis.

While Pelagians speak of grace, it is often just an add-on to the all-powerful human will.

"When some of them tell the weak that all things can be accomplished with God's grace," writes Francis, "deep down they tend to give the idea that all things are possible by the human will, as if it were something pure, perfect, all-powerful, to which grace is then added."

Rather, "in this life human weaknesses are not healed completely and once for all by grace," Francis explains. "Grace, precisely because it builds on nature, does not make us superhuman all at once."

Not acknowledging our limitations "prevents grace from working more effectively within us," he writes. "Unless we can acknowledge our concrete and limited situation, we will not be able to see the real and possible steps that the Lord demands of us at every moment, once we are attracted and empowered by his gift."

Francis reminds us that "The Church has repeatedly taught that we are justified not by our own works or efforts, but by the grace of the Lord, who always takes the initiative." We cannot buy God's friendship with our works, "it can only be a gift born of his loving initiative."

This truth should affect the way we live. It invites us "to live in joyful gratitude for this completely unmerited gift" of his friendship. We can only celebrate this free gift if we realize that our earthly life and natural abilities are his gifts.

Yet some Christians today seek justification through their own efforts. "The result is a self-centered and elitist complacency, bereft of true love," writes Francis. "This finds expression in a variety of apparently unconnected ways of thinking and acting: an obsession with the law, an absorption with social and political advantages, a punctilious concern for the Church's liturgy, doctrine and prestige, a vanity about the ability to manage practical matters, and an excessive concern with programs of self-help and personal fulfillment."

To read the rest of the article about How do you practice faith during the summer -- Click Here to view the whole article on the National Catholic Reporter website. 

Weekly Readings

Weekly reading

© Liturgical Publications Inc

Catholic News from the USCCB

President of U.S. Bishops' Conference and Committee Chairman Response to Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report

WASHINGTON—Cardinal

Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, is hosting a series of meetings this week responding to the broader

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Domestic Justice Chairman Welcomes Change in Catechism Calling for Abolition of the Death Penalty

WASHINGTON—Following

the publication of the revised section of the Catechism of the Catholic Church

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President of U.S. Bishops Conference Issues Statement on Course of Action Responding to Moral Failures on Part of Church Leaders

WASHINGTON—Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo, Archbishop of

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Mass Times

St. Mary, Briggsville
Weekend Mass Schedule

Sunday, 8:00 am
Weekday Mass Schedule
Wednesday, 8:15 am

St. Mary, Portage
Weekend Mass Schedule
Saturday, 4:00 pm
Sunday, 9:30 & 11:00 am
Weekday Mass Schedule
Tuesday, 5:00 pm
Thursday, 8:15 am
Friday, 7:00 am
(on the first Friday of each Month Mass is held at Divine Savior Hospital in Portage.)

St. Mary, Portage & St. Mary, Briggsville Calendar of Events

Click on the image below to view our full calendar.

Staff

Office Hours

St. Mary, Portage
Parish Center Hours
Monday- Closed
Tuesday- 9am-4pm
Wednesday- 9am-4pm
Thursday- 9am-4pm
Friday- 9am-4pm

St. Mary, Briggsville
no appointment needed

View Our St. Mary, Portage "Foundations for Our Future" Video

Foundations for Our Future- Capital Campaign Information

 Please click on the image below for information about our Capital Campaign.

Locate Us- St. Mary, Portage

Address

St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception
307 W. Cook St.
309 W. Cook St. (mailing address)
Portage, WI 53901

St. Mary Help of Christians
N565 County Rd. A
PO Box 127 (mailing address)
Briggsville, WI 53920

Locate Us- St. Mary, Briggsville